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Jul 29, 2011

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Debra

Embalmed food is actually what we know as processed food! Yes, words are power and embalmed food tells the truth. Must have been the Fortune 500 food companies that came up with the contemporary meaning of the sterile, safe, sheep's clothing "processed foods" term.

How enlightening! Time to change my vocabulary. . .

Debra Lewis

I broke down a few weeks ago and bought "fat free cheese" wondering at the same time how there could possibly be such a thing and knowing damn good and well there wasn't and I was being duped. Broiled some on top of scissor-cut wheat tortilla and, my god, the stuff hardly melts. I tried again and cooked it normal time. Still, when I ate it, it hardly allowed me to chew it. Yuck! Who thinks up that crap?

Debra Lewis

The new phrase "embalmed foods" has enlivened my spirit! Today being Saturday and my one meal extravagent day for the week and it being summer, I was planning a Red Robin peppercorn burger, hold the cheese and bacon, then cut it in half immediately upon it getting to my table and destroying the second half with table salt. However, thanks to "embalmed food" I've already prepped my own quality and lean ground beef, shapped it, will grill it this afternoon and top with tons of fresh veggies, including a freshly picked tomato slice from my garden, and whole wheat bun. Yum! The whole "embalmed foods" phrase as just boosted my engines on this my extravagant eating day.

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  • I am a political scientist specializing in food politics and a suburban professional trying my best to live and eat well in an age of fast talking, fast food, and fast depleting agricultural resources. This blog is my attempt to transform the abstract lessons I have learned in the scholarly arena into regionally sustainable recipes that with little effort manifest as local provender on the seasonal table, good for the body, good for the soul, and good for Colorado. Please join me in this modest, but urgent conversation on how we can better feed ourselves and our familes, help our local economies, and build a better food culture . . . from the soil up.

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